Tuesday, 27 November 2007

Patterns


better a little bigger - click on picture to enlarge

Oh dear, having vowed that I would not post any more of these for a few days, I am desperate - and I particularly like this one!

The innocent and impersonal pleasure to be had from creating repetitive patterns is really basic and important, isn't it? Little has equalled the particular childhood joy of cutting out and unfolding snowflakes or rows of paper dolls. Or the spirograph - who else remembers when these first became popular kids' toys? Little, at least, until this!

Recapturing this kind of pleasure is a special delight. I've known people whose particular brand of self-absorbed neurosis clearly made such a blessed temporary ego-bypass and instant entry into 'flow' impossible for them, and am hugely grateful that my own admittedly huge ego and admittedly huge neuroses don't seem to intrude here.

9 comments:

marja-leena said...

Another lovely one, Jean. Your choices for the starting image are always interesting. The act of making repeating patterns is very meditative, I think.
Something about these patterns also make me think of Moorish architectural details.

Lucy said...

You have transcended the medium!
I remember spirograph well, my friends' little girl had one recently for a birthday. I remember the frustration when the wheel's teeth jumped out of the gear and a nasty jagged line spoiled the pattern too. Nothing for it but to begin again.

Your images take me somewhere else.

ruth said...

jean, so here you are again, metamorphosed and ever present and honest. nice to see you!

leslee said...

Very nice. And I remember spirographs! I haven't played around with the picasa patterns yet - probably better I don't start!

Dave said...

I not only remember spirographs - I still have the set! And I can still sing the goofy advertizing jingle from the early 70s.

Omykiss said...

there is something hypnotic about symmetry and patterns ..... lovely!

zhoen said...

I loved playing with my spirograph. Even though it could be tricky. As a kid, I was never good at figuring out 'what to draw' so I often "drew patterns." Still like graph paper.

Zinnia Cyclamen said...

I loved Spirograph too, and Altair Design - does anyone remember those? - here if you're interested http://www.amazon.co.uk/Altair-Design-Special-Patterns-Everyone/dp/1899618252
Both were a blessing for me as an artistic colour-loving child who had been convinced by a teacher that she could neither draw nor paint, a block that is with me to this day.

Udge said...

Sigh. Spirograph! heady days. I loved that so much.